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View Full Version : The Cryo-Treating thread


oni jake
08-21-2012, 02:31 PM
I've been scouring the internet for Cryo-treating information and exactly what it does.

Cryo-treating metal decreases wear somewhere around %15-30. By freezing metal down to and past it's absolute zero point molecules can rest in place. A period of 12 to 24 hours afterwards, the metal is brought back up to room temperature where the basic structure of atoms, molecules, and other wizardry stuff align to form a stronger bond.

I'm creating this thread because I recently had my SR20 transmission gears treated and installing them right now. The metal scientist who treated the gear set informed me that he used his sorcerer powers to make them withstand more force from clutch kicks.

Sounds fascinating, so I did research on it and found a few articles claiming dudes from other automotive interests (RallyX, Nascar, F1) also jumped on the cryotreating band wagon and treat just about everything on the car.

Cranks, pistons, rods, valves, blocks, heads, brake rotors, flywheels, etc. I would just like to know if there is anyone on here with DIRECT experience with treating car stuff. I'm kicking around the idea of treating my entire SR20DET motorset to help make it bullet proof and decrease wear, ultimately meaning more time driving and less time fixing.

P-Funk alot
08-21-2012, 03:14 PM
we used to cryo treat go kart pistons and valve train mainly because you dont get as much heat expansion after its done, so you can have tighter clearances. thats the extent of my knowledge on cryo treating though.

waxball88
08-21-2012, 03:26 PM
I'm pretty sure you can't go below absolute zero?

oni jake
08-21-2012, 03:45 PM
I'm pretty sure you can't go below absolute zero?

Forgive me, I was talking about the metal's absolute freezing point. Somewhere around -310*F

G240
08-21-2012, 03:52 PM
On average whats the price of Cryo Treating transmission gears?

Croustibat
08-22-2012, 03:19 AM
Check motoiq.com, they use a "new" kind of these process to strenghten all kind of parts, from gears to rods. Seeing as cosworth uses that too, i would give it a shot.
I think it is called WPA. It is supposed to be better than cryo.

mxexux
08-22-2012, 03:48 AM
^^ Its called WPC and it is something completely different than cryo-treating. WPC is similar to shot-peening. Check out motoiq for more info.

59bhp
08-22-2012, 04:31 AM
^^ Its called WPC and it is something completely different than cryo-treating. WPC is similar to shot-peening. Check out motoiq for more info.

both are a surface hardening treatment, shot peening (as a method of work hardening) has been around for hundreds of years in one form or another,

the cryo treating is relatively new however the theory behind it is certainly interesting,

I briefly ran this past my materials lecturer at university (a metallurgist with numerous phd's) and he said, at least on the face of it, seemed legitimate.

From what i've read on the subject it is more of a "belt and braces" situation than a magic wand so to speak (like most hardening processes).

oni jake
09-05-2012, 04:47 PM
From what i've read on the subject it is more of a "belt and braces" situation than a magic wand so to speak (like most hardening processes).

Belts and braces is exactly what we're looking for. We're doing Pro-AM and going out to one event costs more than it would to treat the entire motorset. So, if something like this does help in keeping the motor in good shape, why not at least experiment with it?



An update for the Zilvian information highway. Blocks, cranks, everything can be treated, but in some cases it is not recommended. Aluminum blocks with steel sleeves can end up in severe cracking because of the different temperature expansion of two different metals. So, if you were to take on this process you would need to bore out the sleeves, treat it, then press in new sleeves. From my understanding, almost all metals benefit from the cryo-treating process, but the benefit may never be realized. This process benefits any metal that rubs or wear, or is subjected to extreme temperatures. Pistons, rings, valves, and bearings are all good places to start.

When I build my next motor I'll have this done and post up details.